Metonymy

A Metonymy is a figure of speech where one noun stands for another related noun.  There are many different varieties.  Bullinger lists the following:

I. OF THE CAUSE.

i. The person acting for the thing done.
ii. The instrument for the thing effected.
iii. The thing or action for the thing produced by it.
iv. The material for the thing made from or of it.

II. OF THE EFFECT.

i. The action or effect for the person producing it.
ii. The thing effected for the instrument or organic cause of it.
iii. The effect for the thing or action causing it.
iv. The thing made for the material from which it is made or produced.

III. OF THE SUBJECT.

i. The subject receiving for the thing received.
ii. The container for the contents.
iii. The possessor for the thing possessed.
iv. The object for that which pertains or relates to it.
v. The thing signified for the sign.

IV. OF THE ADJUNCT.

i. The accident for the subject.
ii. The contents for the container.
iii. The time for the things done or existing in it.
iv. The appearance of a thing for its nature; or, the opinion about it for the thing itself.
v. The action or affection for the object of it.
vi. The sign for the thing signified.
vii. The name of a person for the person himself, or the thing.
Ethelbert William Bullinger, Figures of Speech Used in the Bible (London; New York: Eyre & Spottiswoode; E. & J. B. Young & Co., 1898), 539.