Lecture 7 – Textual Expository Goals

Back to Lessons

Audio  |   Video  |   Lecture Outline

.

2) For a textual expository sermon

.

a) The goals envisioned for the discussion of a textual expository sermon.

.

1- An explication of the setting of the text

2 Cor. 4:1-2
2 Tim. 4:4

James W. Alexander, Thoughts on Preaching, (Edinburgh: Banner of Truth Trust, 1975), p. 238.

(a) It should be characterized by accuracy, perspicuity, and brevity.

(b) Let the extent of the explication be determined by the text.

– The text may be treated accurately with very little reference to its context or setting.

– The context may have been underscored or opened up in the introduction.

.

2- A convincing explanation of the meaning of the words of the text

“The Bible should be explained, not under the influence of a vivid imagination but under the influence of a heart imbued with a love of truth, and by an understanding disciplined to investigate the meaning of words and phrases, and capable of rendering a reason for the interpretation which is proposed.” Albert Barnes, Notes on the New Testament, Galatians, (Grand Rapids: Baker Book House, 1884-85), p. 375.

(a) The explanation should be characterized by accuracy, clarity, and brevity.

Robert L. Dabney, Sacred Rhetoric, (Edinburgh: Banner of Truth Trust, 1979), pp. 160-161.

(b) Qualifications

.

3- An articulation of the burden of the text

The Puritan method was to state what they called the “doctrine” contained in the text.

.

4- Application of the abiding message and demands of the text

Here we encounter what the Puritans called the “uses” of the text.

.

b) The disciplines essential for the attainment of the goals for the discussion of textual expository sermon

1- The initial steps

(a) Earnest prayer for the present assistance of the Holy Spirit

William G. T. Shedd, Homiletics & Pastoral Theology, (London: Banner of Truth Trust, 1965), pp. 115-116.

(b) Attentive and repeated reading of the text in its native setting

John Murray, Collected Writing of John Murray, (Edinburgh: Banner of Truth Trust, 1976). pp. 212-213.

(c) Careful analysis of the text itself

– Grammatical construction

– Key words

(d) Conserve the fruit of your study, thoughts, outlines, applications on several sheets before you.

– Pastor Martin’s method of keeping three study sheets before him throughout his preparation:

1) An exegesis study sheet

2) A homiletical suggestions sheet

3) Possible applications sheet

.

2- The intermediate steps

(a) Reduce the materials to their natural divisions.

Illustration:

Foundation materials

Framing materials

Finishing materials

D. Martyn Lloyd-Jones, Preaching and Preachers, (Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 1972.), pp. 207-208.

(b) Wisely arrange the divisions.

– Consult the lecture from the previous unit dealing with “the necessity for perspicuity of form and structure in our sermons.”

(c) Carefully word the divisions.

– Seek to use linguistic parallelism in the words of your divisions. In this connection Rodale’s Synonym Finder is an invaluable tool.

.

3- The concluding steps

(a) Work in the illustrations.

(b) Work in the applications.

(c) Work in the connections and transitions.

– Don’t put your sermons together with invisible glue or transparent mortar.

.

c) Miscellaneous suggestions in the construction of the discussion or argument of a textual expository sermon

1- Seek to expose yourself to a variety of good models of textual expository preaching.

– Written sermons

Thomas Manton, The Complete Works of Thomas Manton, Vol. 17, p. 191ff.

– use SermonAudio

2- Continually read those authors who have written on the subject of textual expository preaching.

3- Don’t ever imbibe the notion that you have peaked and all you can do from here is maintain your ground or go downhill.

1 Tim. 4:15
2 Tim 2:15

4- Welcome and judiciously receive the criticism of competent critics of your efforts.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email