Lecture 11 – Full Manuscript Pros

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B. Transitional concern: How much (if any) of the sermon should be committed to full manuscript form as a part of sermon preparation?

Introduction

1. General scriptural principles

a. The mandate of maximum edification

1 Cor. 14:12,26b
Rom. 14:19

b. The mandate of maximum accuracy

2 Tim. 2:15; 4:9, 21

c. The mandate of manifest progress

1 Tim. 4:12-15

d. The mandate of spiritual freedom

1 Thess. 5:19

Summary

Rev. Nicholas Murray, Preachers and Preaching, (New York: Harper & Brothers, 1860), p. 123.

2. A survey of the main arguments for both sides of the issue.

a. The strong arguments for detailed written composition.

1) It forces you to wrestle with clarity of expression.

Charles Bridges, The Christian Ministry, (Edinburgh: Banner of Truth Trust, 1976), p. 289.

James Stewart, Preaching, (London: English Universities Press LTD, 1963), p. 158.

2) It forces you to cut off the fat of empty verbiage.

Charles Bridges, The Christian Ministry, (Edinburgh: Banner of Truth Trust, 1976), pp. 289, 292.

3) It forces you to wrestle with the difficult aspects of rhetorical art.

a) Pungent statement

b) Clear transitions

c) Excellence of Style

John A. Broadus, On the Preparation and Delivery of Sermons, (Birmingham, AL: Solid Ground Christian Books, 2005), pp. 439-440.

d) Completeness of thought

4) It aids in the fixation of the mind.

John A. Broadus, On the Preparation and Delivery of Sermons, (Birmingham, AL: Solid Ground Christian Books, 2005), p. 439.

5) It may lay a foundation for future and extended usefulness as a printed discourse.

6) It ought to give general facility in writing.

7) It can be a means of grace to alleviate excessive anxiety.

John A. Broadus, On the Preparation and Delivery of Sermons, (Birmingham, AL: Solid Ground Christian Books, 2005), pp. 440-441.

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