Lecture 10 – Constituent Elements: Conclusion

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c. The conclusion or peroration of a sermon

– Introduction

a) The terminology used for the conclusion

Austin Phelps, The Theory of Preaching, (New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1882), p. 454.

b) The necessity for the conclusion

Robert L. Dabney, Sacred Rhetoric, (Edinburgh: Banner of Truth Trust, 1979), pp. 168-169.

c) The crucial importance of the conclusion

John W. Etter, The Preacher and His Sermon, (Dayton, OH: United Brethren Publishing House, 1888), pp. 365-367.

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1) The goals or functions of the conclusion

a) Riveting to the minds of your hearers the essential content of the sermon

b) Pressing home to the consciousness and consciences of the hearers the moral and emotional thrust of the sermon

Robert L. Dabney, Sacred Rhetoric, (Edinburgh: Banner of Truth Trust, 1979), p. 178.

Robert L. Dabney, Sacred Rhetoric, (Edinburgh: Banner of Truth Trust, 1979), pp. 234-235.

c) Appealing to the consciences and wills of the hearers to obey the volitional demands of the sermon

Robert L. Dabney, Sacred Rhetoric, (Edinburgh: Banner of Truth Trust, 1979), p. 174.

Summary

B. M. Palmer, The Life and Letters of James Henley Thornwell, (Edinburgh: Banner of Truth Trust, 1974), pp. 547-549.

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2) The means to attain these goals

a) By recapitulation

1- With brevity

2- With restriction to the foregoing materials

3- With perspicuity

4- With climactic order

Robert L. Dabney, Sacred Rhetoric, (Edinburgh: Banner of Truth Trust, 1979), pp. 169-170.

b) By the use of inference

c) By specific delineations of the demands of the truth considered

d) By direct appeals to the conscience and will

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